Sustainable NE Seattle

Connecting for a sustainable community

Comments due May 14th on P-patch oppurtunity!

Please help Maple Leaf convert more sunny community space to food production!
If you have been unable to attend any of the design meetings, but would like to advocate for more P-Patch/community garden space in the city please read and take a moment to submit your comments to Kellee Jones.
The following is an email from the Dept. of Neighborhoods:



The Maple Leaf Reservoir covering project will add 15 acres to the
existing Maple Leaf

Playground and Playfields. Three
design alternatives for the Maple
Leaf Reservoir Park project have been presented for public comment.

Drawings and descriptions of all
three concepts are available online at
www.mapleleafcommunity.org/cc_umlp_pg.html.

Comments on the concepts are due by Friday, May 14. The public is being asked to comment
on #1) which theme (Waves,
Commons, or Vista) they prefer and #2)
offer a list of priorities
for park amenities (top five or so amenities). There are considerable limitations and not

everything can fit in the limited space which is why they need to
hear what the public really,
really wants to have in the park.


Regarding amenities, the landscape architects emphasized that just because an amenity

isn't on one of the concepts, if
there is enough demand for it, they need to know that so what they can accommodate
it within the chosen concept. All
three designs respect the neighborhood’s request for open spaces, respecting
the views available, and the needs
for gathering

spaces. Waves and Vista respects the neighborhoods overwhelming
desire to keep the ballfields on
the southern/lower portion of the park. But amenity-wise, Commons and Vista do not have an off-leash dog
area; none of the three specify
p-patches; Waves and Vista have no basketball,

tennis, or pickleball courts; only one mentions an additional
restroom; and only Commons specifies a splash pad/spray play. These are all examples
of amenities that have been
consistently mentioned as important in previous comments from the community. Whatever amenity/feature that
you feel ought to be prioritzed,
this opinion needs to be communicated.


Comments regarding park layout/concept themes and/or park amenities should be emailed to kellee.jones@seattle.gov or mailed to
800 Maynard So., Suite 300 —
Seattle, WA 98134.
Although comments are always accepted by the Parks Department, for the landscape

architect to be able to really incorporate the public
input into the final decision
making, please send in your comments by Friday, May 14.


If you have specific questions, you can email Donna Hartmann-Miller, who is one of

the volunteers working on the
Project. She can be reached at reservoirpark@mapleleafcommunity.org



When you think or talk to others
about P-Patch Community Gardens, please remember

what they bring to a community:

· Low operations and maintenance costs;
gardeners do all the maintenance on the
land, including those on City-owned

properties

· Reduction of public safety challenges in
communities


· Volunteer program that provides huge community benefits including:

· Food Bank gardening program donates more
than 28,000 lbs. of produce annually

· Community events in P-Patches open to all (music programs, BBQs)

· Community –based programming (children’s
programs, nutrition education programs)
·
Culturally-sensitive
acculturation programming for refugees with limited literacy and

English-language skills

· Strong partnerships with nonprofits that
bring additional resources and volunteer

hours

· P-Patch Community Gardening Program has
operated as a strong partnership with community

members for 37 years; it has a
reputation as one of the most successful

municipal community gardening
programs in the U.S. in the number of plots,

sustainability and community
engagement






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